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Au Printemps

Au Printemps

Au Printemps

Au Printemps (64 bd. Haussmann, Opéra/Grands Boulevards, Paris)(Metro: Havre Caumartin, Opéra) – this department store, in business since 1865, is reminiscent of Saks 5th Avenue and Macy’s in New York. It is housed within three buildings and divided accordingly:

1.) Printemps Mode: this is the main store for women’s fashion and accessories, and has hundreds of brands, including top designers like Chanel, Prada and Calvin Klein.

2.) Printemps Homme: dedicated to men’s fashion and accessories, carrying various designer and mid-range brands.

3.) Printemps Beauty & Home: located between the women’s and men’s dedicated stores, and carries beauty and spa products, gourmet food and home furnishings. There is also a panoramic terrace and cafe.


404 Restaurant

404 Restaurant

404 Restaurant

404 Restaurant (69 rue des Gravilliers, Paris) (Metro: Arts et Métiers) – located adjacent to “Andy Wahloo” bar, this restaurant showcases North African cuisine, complete with the Moroccan décor. Patron can order chicken, preserved lemon & olive tangine, lamb skewer couscous, and sweet pastry of dates for dessert.

METRO

METRO

METRO

METRO — The quick and easy way to travel around the city, as well as the best value. The Paris metro has around 300 stations, their entrances marked by a big yellow “M”, and 16 lines, numbered from 1 to 14, 3 bis and 7 bis.

Each line has a color, which you’ll find on signs in the stations and on all the RATP maps. Connections between lines make your journey easy to plan. For an idea of your journey time, allow an average of 2 minutes per station and add 5 minutes for each connection.

Each line has two directions, indicated by the terminus station at each end (for example: Balard/Créteil). The different directions and connections are clearly displayed on blue and white signs on the platforms and in the tunnels. To be sure you’re heading in the right direction, check that your destination is on the list of stations just before you go down onto the platform. Inside the trains, you’ll find network maps and the detail of the line you’re on along with all available connections to other parts of the network.

The metro operates every day including public holidays from around 6:00 am to 12.30 am. Times of the first and last trains vary depending on the point along the line that you are departing from. Trains are less frequent on Sundays and public holidays.

Your white-colored ticket remains valid for 2 hours until you leave the metro by going though the exit barriers. If you then take a bus, you need to use another ticket. If you happen to have kept some old green or yellow tickets from an earlier trip, you can still use them.

Metro fares/deals: visitors are strongly encouraged to buy at least one book of Metro tickets (each one containing 10 tickets, costing €13.30 (standard fare for those from 10 years of age and up). The same book of 10 tickets for children from 4 to 9 years of age costs €6.65

These tickets, called “t+ tickets”, allow passengers to travel on:

* metro lines
* RER lines (RATP and SNCF) within Paris (zone 1)
* Ile-de-France bus lines (RATP and OPTILE), except Orlybus and Roissybus (see the specific conditions below for the Noctilien network and lines with special fares: 299, 350 and 351)
* tramway lines (RATP and SNCF)
* the Montmartre funicular

The following types of connections are possible with this ticket:

* metro/metro
* metro/RER and RER/RER within Paris
* bus/bus (including between the RATP and OPTILE networks), bus/tram and tram/tram for 90 minutes between the first and last validation

Map for Paris Metro system: http://www.ratp.fr/plan-interactif/carteidf.php?lang=uk

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

 

Arc de Triomphe (Pl. Charles de Gaulle, Champs Élysées, Paris)(Metro: Étoile) – this 164-foot monument was built by Napoleon to commemorate his military victories. On the Arc’s sides are sculptures by François Rude, such as The Departure of the Volunteers in 1792 (a.k.a. La Marseillaise), to the right of the arch when viewed from the Champs-Élysées. Names of Napoléon’s generals are inscribed on the stone facades—the underlined names identify the hallowed figures who died in battle. Regarding the traffic circle around the Arc, it’s known locally as L’Étoile” (Star), since 12 avenues stem from it in star-like fashion.

Visitors can go to the Arc’s upper level for a panoramic view of the city from there. Hours: 10:00 am – 11:00 pm (April 1st – September 30th); 10:00 am – 10:30 pm (October 1st – March 31st). Admission: €9.50 (Adult); Children (18 and under) (Free); EU citizens, and non-European permanent residents of France (Free)

Aquarium de Paris

Aquarium de Paris

Aquarium de Paris

Aquarium de Paris (5 av. Albert de Mun, Champs-Élysées, Paris)(Metro: Trocedéro) – located within Trocadéro gardens, this aquarium has a large collection of exotic fish (over 10,000) from various underwater regions of the world that has a French presence – from the French Caribbean islands and French Guiana, to French Polynesia (including Tahiti), Reunion/Mayotte (Indian Ocean) to the Mediterranean. That, as well as a separate shark tank. There’s even a section where visitors are allowed to touch some of the fish (le basin caresses). In addition, there are also two movie theater screens (a section known as “CineAqua”) which show various films related to sea life.

Hours: Daily from 10:00 am to 7:00 pm. Admission: Adults (€19.90), Children 13 to 17 (€15.90), Children 3 to 12 (€12.90), Children under 3 years old (Free). Various discount rates are also available.

Andy Wahloo

Andy Wahloo

Andy Wahloo

Andy Wahloo (69 rue des Gravilliers, Paris) (Metro: Arts et Métiers) — Andy Wahloo transports its clientele to trendy 70s Morocco in a stunning environment which could easily have been the watering hole of choice for the stars of the time. It was designed purely and simply to allow nearby « 404 Restaurant » customers to wait for their table in a comfortable environment, but has evolved naturally into a popular local bar with a dedicated and loyal customer base of its own. From Wednesday to Saturday, DJs get the evenings going with sophisticated electro, hip-hop and tropical electro.

 

Arènes de Lutèce

Arènes de Lutèce

Arènes de Lutèce

Arènes de Lutèce (47 rue Monge, Latin Quarter, Paris)(Metro: Pl. Monge, Cardinal Lemoine) – this amphitheater is one of the few artifacts from the Roman era. Rediscovered in 1869, what remains is part of the stage and tiered seating. These days, the area is either used by student soccer players or by retirees playing boules.

About Paris

Paris

Paris

Paris, the French capital, is chocking in history – going back to the Roman Empire, when it was just a small settlement (when the country was then known as “Gaul”). Even before then, a Celtic tribe called the Parisii (where the city eventually got its name) was thought to have settled there around 250 BC.

Going through various periods since then (including the Frankish, Merovingian Carolingian, Capetian, and Bourbon dynasties, Paris was already considered a major European center for learning and the arts by the 12th century, and was the largest city in Europe until the 18th century. Paris also acted as the epicenter of the French Revolution during the late 1700s (which included the infamous guillotining of King Louis XVI and Queen Marie Antoinette in 1793), and reached prominence during the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 1800s.

Under the rule of Napoleon III (Napoleon Bonaparte’s nephew), Paris was physically transformed when he had entire districts leveled, eliminating their narrow, and often winding medieval streets in favor of a network of wide avenues and neo-classical façades that are still seen in the streets of the city today. During the early 20th century, Paris, taking similar action to other metropolises like New York City, built its own local Métro subway system to accommodate its growing population (with another rail system, RER, covering Paris’ outer lying areas and suburbs, being built during the 1960s).

With Paris earning a reputation for its cultural & artistic communities, as well as its nightlife during the 1920s & 1930s, it weathered through the Nazi occupation during World War II, being spared much of the aerial bombings that befell other European cities at that time. Since then, the city has grown, with the construction of large social estates known as cités (in Paris’ outer lying suburbs, which accommodated the arrival of immigrant blue collar workers from former French colonies in North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and the French Caribbean) and the beginning of La Défense — the business district.

Visitors from all walks of life will not be bored with Paris – whether you’re a history buff, a sports enthusiast, music lover, an artist, or a gastronomer. Given Paris’ history, the city will likely see another wave of transformation as the 21st century moves forward.

Le Jules Verne Resturant Eiffel Tower Paris

Paris Eiffel Tower Jules Verne

Le Jules Verne Restaurant Paris: located on the Eiffel tower’s second level, the quality of the French cuisine is assured by the presence of world-class chef Alain Ducasse. Because of demand for seating (in part to enjoy the city view from that level of Eiffel Tower), reservations (if possible weeks in advance) are recommended.

Paris Eiffel Tower Jules Verne Restaurant

Reservations: Phone: +33 (0)1 45 55 61 44

Le 58 Tour Eiffel Restaurant Paris

58 Tour Eiffel

Le 58 Tour Eiffel: located on the tower’s first level, this 200-seat restaurant seats 200 diners, offering traditional French cuisine.

Reservations:  Phone: +33 (0)1 72 76 18 46